TMI

We are drowning in information right now.  The water around exercise and nutrition feels particularly deep.  There are just so many competing voices that it makes it difficult to know who to listen to, what to do, and what you can happily ignore.

How do we tackle the problem of too much information at Bang?  We make it possible for you to just show up and do the work—without needing to second-guess every decision.

Some of the methods we use to make this happen:

  • Getting alignment on you
  • Finding commonalities
  • Superb fundamentals
  • Long-term skill development



Getting alignment on you

We spend a lot of time up front getting to know what your priorities are—both in terms of outcomes and experience.  Most of us could use a little accountability when it comes to clarifying what’s essential, what’s nice to have, and what simply isn’t a priority.  Knowing what to say no to is a key skill in just about any area of your life.

I would encourage anyone to grab a pen and blank sheet of paper and to write out their values and priorities before jumping right into tactics.  For us, getting early alignment here often allows to make subtle but important changes to how we write and coach exercise programs.


Finding commonalities

One health coach trumpets the life-changing value of going keto.  A second influencer tells you that your performance will suffer horribly without carbohydrates.  A third tells you that supplements are absolutely essential to success.  And a fourth says that everyone needs to eat an all-meat diet (and probably uses the term “sheeple” a lot).

We don’t get hung up on details.  We instead ask what everyone who is getting positive results has in common.  We filter these answers through the lens of evidence and personal preference.

So, rather than get dogmatic or chase red herrings, we can look at the above approaches and conclude that they all:
 

  • ​Manage total calorie intake in one way or another
  • Encourage adequate nutrient content
  • Give you decision-making tools to minimize stress around food-related decisions

Everything else is personal preference and style.  We start with a rough draft, make sure it fits your life and preferences, and reduces the number of decisions you need to make.  We continue to experiment and troubleshoot over time.  No drama.  Just steady progress.

Superb fundamentals

Much ado is made about being brilliant at the basics.  But so much more ado is required.  All of the ado.  That’s because brilliance at the basics is the heart of mastery.  Think of it like an expert pianist practicing scales.  No concert pianist thinks they’re too advanced to do so.  And the real masters can make those notes ring.

Last week, I shared some of our ideas around mindfulness.  They apply here because when we find deep value in the little things, we are no longer driven to rush through them.

Long-term skill development

One thing you do not need to do at Bang is show up knowing everything.  We’ll start you wherever you need to start.  I think that’s one of the reasons that beginners feel so welcome with us.

It is neither reasonable nor useful to expect everyone to be able to execute the same movements with excellence.  Skills vary.  Bodies vary.  Learning styles vary.  Injuries and other constraints vary.  So, we ask a very important question from Day 1: what is the hardest thing you can do well?

Once we have dialled into the right challenges at the right time, we earn the right to ask an exciting question: what is the very next thing that will move you forward?  What is the next skill, idea, or challenge to introduce?  And then we drip it in.  Bit by bit.  Never rushed.  Always fun—or at least compelling.  The result?  Some truly remarkable skills emerge—and continue to develop over time.

Not overthinking things is freeing

Not needing to second-guess your workouts for safety or effectiveness is a relief.  Feeling confident about your progress is a relief.  Knowing that you’ve got support-on-demand is a relief.  These things free you up to just show up and do your best.  Good things flow from there.  So, do what you need to create that clarity.